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Give yourself the GIFT of being a detail-oriented TECHNICIAN.
EMPOWER yourself with the ABILITY to LEARN skills that don't come easily to you.
Use my sadomasochistic TUTORING to learn how.

HELLO, I'm Dr. David LIAO.

I tutor AP PHYSICS, AP CALCULUS, and introductory ARBITRAGE-FREE PRICING.
I show you how to read, reason, and write with
EXCRUCIATING attention to detail!

Relying merely on being bright might have created the illusion of success in elementary school. That same strategy is really crappy for geometry, physics, and calculus. You get misery, excuses, and suffering.

Resist the habit of almost unconsciously doing everything in your head. You need to do your work in microscopic steps. Yes, even when your naivety monster fools you into believing you don't have to.

Take a look at what I mean by "microscopic steps" by watching a video …

Watch the 16.5-min video above, "A SiQuENC for developing and communicating written REASoNing for AP Physics 1 and 2," to work your way from "I know what is going on, but I don't know how to say it" to "I know that my response included a complete argument."

… or reading my article in The Physics Teacher

The following article appeared in D. Liao, "A SiQuENC for solving physics problems," Phys. Teach., 56, 264-265 (April 2018) and may be found at doi:10.1119/1.5028250. Copyright 2018 American Association of Physics Teachers.

This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Association of Physics Teachers.

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eTutorial

… or walking through an interactive tutorial.

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I use multiple representations (illustrations, mathematical representations, and words) to review concepts. I walk through cartoons of experiments to highlight individual features of physical laws.

[1] A. Arons, "Student patterns of thinking and reasoning (II)," Phys. Teach. 22, 21-26 (January 1984). <doi:10.1119/1.2341444>.

[2] E. Etkina and A. Van Heuvelen, "Investigative Science Learning Environment -- A Science Process Approach to Learning Physics," in Research-Based Reform of University Physics, edited by E.F. Redish and P.J. Cooney (American Association of Physics Teachers, College Park, MD, 2007), Reviews in PER Vol. 1, <http://www.per-central.org/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=4988>.

I use a mnemonic called SiQuENC to help students to remember to use multiple representations when solving physics problems.

[3] J. Larkin, J. McDermott, D. Simon, and H. Simon, "Expert and novice performance in solving physics problems," Sci. 208, 1335-1342 (1980), <doi:10.1126/science.208.4450.1335>.

[4] E. Etkina, M. Gentile, and A. Van Heuvelen, College Physics (Pearson, Glenview, IL, 2014), pp. xliv-xlv. <amazon:0321715357>.

[5] The following article appeared in D. Liao, "A SiQuENC for solving physics problems," Phys. Teach., 56, 264-265 (April 2018) and may be found at doi:10.1119/1.5028250. 🗎 PDF. Copyright 2018 American Association of Physics Teachers. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Association of Physics Teachers. This article is posted on my personal webpage in accordance with AAPT guidelines.

I use a mnemonic called REASoN to help students to think of points to include in arguments when addressing free-response questions, including the dreaded paragraph-length response, in AP Physics 1.

[6] J. Speirs, W. Ferm, Jr., M. Stetzer, and B. Lindsey, "Probing student ability to construct reasoning chains: a new methodology." Paper presented at the Physics Education Research Conference 2016, Sacramento, CA, July 20-21, 2016. <doi:10.1119/perc.2016.pr.077>.

[7] William N. Ferm Jr., J. Caleb Speirs, MacKenzie R. Stetzer, and Beth Lindsey, "Investigating student ability to follow and interact with reasoning chains," presented at the Physics Education Research Conference 2016, Sacramento, CA, 2016, <doi:10.1119/perc.2016.pr.025>.

[8] K. McNeill, D. Lizotte, J. Krajcik, and R. Marx, "Supporting Students' Construction of Scientific Explanations by Fading Scaffolds in Instructional Materials," J. Learn. Sci. 15(2): 153-191 (2006), <doi:10.1207/s15327809jls1502_1>.

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